Exhibitions: Plywood

During and after the Second World War, the scarcity of materials resulted in the development of a range of new production techniques. Attempts at manufacturing furniture in bent plywood had been made before the war, but in the late forties the techniques had improved substantially, and the first pieces were put into mass-production.

In 1948 Hans J. Wegner presented a chair with a teak plywood seat and back mounted on a beech frame. And the following year, Børge Mogensen used the same teak plywood/beech combination in his version of the “Shell Chair”.

But it was Arne Jacobsen who came to make the most of this new material. His “Ant Chair” from 1951 was not only aesthetically refined, but also a technological achievement; it was the first time the plywood of a chair with seat and back in one piece had been bent in both directions. This chair not only became the first in a long line of light, stackable plywood chairs by Jacobsen, but also showed a new, more sculptural idiom, that came to characterize his work.

Grete Jalk: Chair
Grete Jalk: Chair, 1963
Made by P. Jeppesen. Plywood

Images

Grete Jalk: Chair

Arne Jacobsen: The 7 Chair

Arne Jacobsen: The Seagull Chair

Arne Jacobsen: The Ant Chair

Børge Mogensen: Shell Chair

Børge Mogensen: Shell Chair

Børge Mogensen: Chair

Hans J. Wegner: Shell Chair

Hans J. Wegner: Sawbench Chair

Hans J. Wegner: Sawbench Chair

Poul Kjærholm: PK 0

Nanna Ditzel: Chair

Nanna Ditzel: Chair

Hvidt & Mølgaard: Ax Chair and Table

Hans J. Wegner: Three-Legged Chair

Hans J. Wegner: Three-Legged Chair

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